Best 10000 Watt Generators

So you want to buy a 10000 watt generator?

Are you sure?

We ask because 10000 watts is a lot of power, and usually, generators that can give you that much energy are big, clunky units, used to power many appliances at once.

That means you’ll usually find them on construction sites, bringing power to a whole range of tools, far from a standard plug-in outlet.  

You knew that? You still want one?

OK, if you’re sure…

10000 watt red generator

Whether you’re having a mammoth outdoor event like a wedding or cookout, have your own construction project, need to juice up your RV or hey, even if it’s just a wild weekend and you want to charge a thousand cell phones in the middle of the woods for some reason (we’re not judging), let’s find you the best 10000 watt generators available right now.

OUR TOP PICK

The DuroStar DS10000E doesn’t only take the top spot on our list of 10000 watt generators because it’s pitched at a price that means individuals can buy it, but we’re not going to tell you that’s not a sweet, sweet part of what makes it our favorite. 

There are plenty of impressive generators that can get you 10000 watts of power – finding one that doesn’t cost a half-year’s mortgage is the tricky part.

That, as much as anything else, is why we mentioned they’re usually used by businesses, rather than individuals.

The DuroStar DS10000E brings 10000 watts into the realm where you can buy them.

Of course, we wouldn’t recommend a generator just because it’s cheap.

A BigMac is cheap, but we wouldn’t recommend you try and milk 10000 watts out of one.

The DS10000E has a 16HP, air-cooled DuroStar OHV engine, which gives you the 10000 watts of peak power you need, while cruising at 8,000 watts rated.

The engine has an automatic low oil shutoff, to keep you – and your power supply - safe. 

The generator has a fuel capacity of a handy 8.3 gallons, and in terms of noise, this is one of the most muffled generators on the market.

It runs at just 72dB – somewhere between normal conversation at 3 feet, and a standard telephone dial tone.

In essence then, practically anything you plug into your DuroStar generator will be louder than the generator itself. 

What sort of outlets do you get with the DuroStar?

We’re glad you asked. You’re looking at two 120V household outlets, one 120V 30A twist lock outlet, one 120/240V 30A twist lock outlet, and one 120/240V 50A heavy duty outlet.

Yes, you read that right – just two 120V household outlets.

That might not sound like the juice-the-world power station we promised you, but there’s a pleasing versatility built into the DS10000E. 

DuroStar’s MX2 technology means you can choose to get the maximum power from each of the 120V outlets.

If you decide you need to run the generator at both 120V and 240V at the same time, that’s in your power.

Turn a dial, push a button, and the DuroStar will deliver what you need. 

Also, while the two 120V household outlets might seem a little under-socketed to some people, it’s worth remembering they’re not the only ball game the DS10000E.

The options of two 30A outlets and a 50A outlet give you some hardcore juicing potential, above and beyond the household outlets. 

The DS10000E is EPA and CARB-approved for use in all 50 states, so wherever you are, and whatever local regulations are in place, you can set up your DuroStar and power up.

And what says product confidence than a warranty? The DuroStar DS10000E comes with two, a 1-year commercial warranty and a 3-year residential version.  

The combination of power, budget-friendliness, options, and certification makes the DS10000E our best all-round option when you’re looking for a 10000 watt generator.

Pros:

  • 10000 watts peak power
  • 8.3-gallon fuel tank
  • Very low noise level
  • A range of outlets
  • Budget-friendly generator

Cons:

  • Only 2 household outlets on a high-powered generator

EDITORS CHOICE

The DuroMax XP12000EH has made itself a name as one of the best dual fuel generators on the market.

It comes in a heavy-duty metal frame that gives it both protection and muffling.

In terms of volume, it operates at 74dB, just a little louder than the list-leading DuroStar, but still quieter than a standard telephone dial tone.

The generator has a 457cc, 18HP DuroMax OHV engine, which delivers 12000 watts of peak power and 9500 of continuous power.

If you fuel it instead with propane, you get 11400 watts of peak power and 9025 of rated power.

It can be started either electrically or by a recoil start system, which gives you options on how you start and use it.

Tank size and runtime? For gasoline, you’re looking at 8.3 gallons – the same as the DuroStar.

The great thing about the dual-fuel option though is that you can also add a 40-gallon propane tank to the party and keep those watts pumping night and day.

We mean that almost literally, too – on gasoline, you’ll get almost nine hours of wattage at 50% load, and switching out to propane will get you another seven hours. 

What happens then? Then you sleep, darn it! No-one should be tending a generator more than 16 hours a day.

You come back in the morning, load it up again and it’s good to go.

Outlet-options? The XP12000EH gets you two 120V 20A outlets, one 120/240V 30A outlet, a 120V 30A twist-lock outlet, and a 50A outlet.

As with the DuroStar, the MX2 switch turns your generator up to 11, so to speak, letting you get maximum power from each of the 120V outlets. 

Naturally, to help with system safety, there’s also a voltmeter and a low-oil indicator fitted into the XP12000EH.

It’s EPA-approved, CARB-compliant, and comes with a partridge in a pear tree.

No, alright, not really. No partridges were harmed in the claiming of this falsehood.

It does come with a handy 3-year limited warranty though, so anything that happens to go mysteriously wrong, like sudden partridge-strike, won’t cost you half of all your kingdom in generator replacement costs.

It’s deemed safe in all 50 states, so you can light up the night from Alaska to Florida, or even the ever-cautious California, safe in the knowledge that you have the power, you have the safety, and you have the warranty to back you.

The DuroMax, affectionately known as “The Beast” by everyone except twitchy Revelation readers, delivers everything you could need of a 10000 watt generator and brings an especially useful dual-fuel game to the table.

That lets you party on, work on, or at the very least power on for as long as you need, switching out your fuel sources when necessary.

It’s a beast in terms of its capacity for work, rather than because it wants to bring the world to an end.

In fact, if the world ever does come to an end, grab

The Beast, some gasoline, and some propane, and you’ll be better prepared than most. 

Pros:

  • Dual-fuel, so it can run on gas, propane or both
  • In the event of a natural emergency, can be used as a full home back-up system
  • Wide range of outlets allow for versatility of options
  • Delivers solid fuel efficiency while generating lots of power
  • 72dB operating noise – nowhere near loud enough to set your teeth on edge

Cons:

  • The generator has a solid metal exoskeleton, so it’s heavy to transport
  • Offers two start-up options, but no remote start capability

BEST VALUE

Another promising competitor in the dual-fuel game is the Pulsar G12KBN.

Again, you’re looking at 12000 peak watts or 9500 rated watts if you fuel the Pulsar with gasoline, and around 10800 peak watts, 8550 rated when you run it on propane.

And as with the DuroMax, that means you get the efficiency of choosing and replacing fuels as necessary.

On an 8 gallon tank of gasoline, you’ll get 12 full hours working at half load.

That’s more than a full workday and/or way beyond the point at which any party starts to fade.

In the event that you’re using your pulsar to ride out a natural disaster or emergency situation…we’re guessing you’ll be able to lay your hands on more fuel in a hurry, right?

The Pulsar has a 457cc, single-cylinder, 4-stroke, air-cooled, OHV engine, which should give you what you need in terms of rapid power generation.

There’s an electric start on this model, which makes it pretty hassle-free. 

What does the Pulsar bring you in terms of outlets?

Surprisingly, it has one of the strongest outlet-games on our list.

Four 120V 20A AC outlets, one 120V/240V 30A twist-lock outlet, one 120V/240V 50A outlet, and one 12V DC output give you a regular charge-fest, which is a thing that bumps the Pulsar up our list.

Convenience is another deciding factor on the Pulsar too – with drop-down handles and never-flat wheels, it’s the first generator on our list that feels like portability has been part of its gameplan right from the design stage. 

Naturally, as with the leading generators, you get a low oil meter - though here, it goes further and initiates an auto-shutdown before we get to red alert territory.

There’s a 3-in-1 digital meter, and automatic voltage regulation, so you can use it without worry.

The Pulsar, in an effort to be as helpful as possible, also brings its own propane hose, comes with a limited 1-year warranty, and is CARB-compliant. 

More than a standard dual-fuel generator, the Pulsar thinks of everything, including four domestic power outlets, fold-down handles for transport and storage, and a set of wheels to give the thing a feeling that it can be genuinely portable if and when you need it to.

That, as much as its dual-fuel options and its solid power generation, are what make the Pulsar well worth a look.

Pros:

  • Sturdily-built generator
  • Truly portable, with handles and wheels
  • Dual-fuel options
  • 12 hours of generation from an 8-gallon gasoline tank
  • Enormous range of power outlet options, including 4 domestic outlets
  • Electric start for convenience
  • 1-year limited warranty
  • CARB-compliance

Cons:

RUNNER UP

The All Power America APGG10000 is out to test you, to see if you’re paying attention.

As a generator, it’s all kinds of hot stuff, its 420cc, 15HP OHV air-cooled engine giving you 10,000 watts of peak power and 8000 watts of rated power on standard gasoline.

But beware when you buy – it comes in standard and dual fuel options, meaning if you want to splash out and bring the propane, it’ll cost you more than the standard version.

On top of that, both the standard and dual-fuel versions are EPA-certified right nice but are not CARB-compliant.

In a way, that’s a good option because unless you live in California, EPA-certification may well be enough for you.

If you do live in California and want to fire up the All Power America, you have to make sure to check the appropriate box on your order form and watch the price digits jump again.

Once you’ve chosen the right option for you though, the APGG10000 is a solid option to use in the event of a natural crisis, in the event of having an RV and wanting to Do Things around it, or in the event of operating a construction site. 

The basic single-fuel model will give you around 9.5 hours of power on half-load from 8 gallons of gasoline.

In terms of outlets, you’re looking at one 12V DC outlet, four 120V AC receptacles, one 120/240V twist-lock outlet, and a 120V twist-lock receptacle. Enough for you?

The All Power America may be your generator of choice. 

Be aware, this is one of the noisier generators on our list, clocking up a working noise level of 76 dB – more than any other generator so far.

You’re still nowhere near needing ear protectors, but with the APGG10000, it’s starting to become a noticeable factor

As with the Pulsar, portability has been thought of in the APGG10000 – fold-down handles and never-flat tires mean you can legitimately transport it without causing yourself an injury. 

As a portable, powerful generator, the APGG10000 is worth considering.

If you go for it though, make sure you get the variant that’s right for your area and your needs.

Pros:

  • Straightforward generator to use
  • 9.5 hours of power from 8 gallons of gasoline
  • Portable, with handles and never-flat tires
  • 7 outlets

 

Cons:

  • Loudest generator on the list so far
  • Multiple versions make for a tricky purchase process

RUNNER UP

Our final dual-fuel choice is the WEN DF1100T.

A 457 ccs, 4-stroke OHV engine gets you 11,000 peak watts and 8,300 running watts when powered by gasoline, and 9,500 peak watts and 7,500 running watts on propane.

There’s a key-turn electric start on the DF1100T, for ease, reliability, and above all, protection from accidental starts. 

The gasoline fuel tank is notably smaller than all the others on our list though, at just 6.6 gallons.

That means you can run the generator for up to 8.5 hours on one refill. 

There are six outlets to choose from, including four 120V 5-20R GFCI outlets, one 120V 30A outlet with a twist lock (LS-30R), and a 120V/240V 50 AMP outlet, which should amount to plenty of powered-up fun or practicality, depending on your needs.

As with some of the higher-placed generators, there are a handful of safety features on the DF1100T, including an hour counter, an automatic voltage regulator, and an automatic kill feature, which kicks in if the engine ever malfunctions.

And being keen to make the most of its dual-fuel capacity, the DF1100T comes with a 47–inch propane hose as standard.

EPA-certified and CARB-compliant, the DF1100T comes with a two-year limited warranty.

While it has a smaller capacity than many, and while it’s on the heavier side, its handful of outlet options make it worth considering.

Pros:

  • Dual-fuel options
  • Wide range of outlets
  • EPA-certified and CARB-approved

Cons:

  • Smaller fuel tank than many
  • On the heavy side, despite portability options

Buyer’s Guide

When buying the right 10000 watt generator for you, you’ll need to answer some fundamental questions about how you intend to use the equipment.

Doing so will give you a clearer pathway through the market, and help you find the generator that’s right for your particular needs.

Portability

The likelihood is that you’re going to use your generator in outdoor or portable settings.

That means the weight and the portability options on your generator are going to be important if you’re not going to twinge a back muscle here and there.

Match the generator both to your power requirements and the practicalities of getting it to where you need it.

What’s In The Tank?

Oh, about those power requirements. One of the most important equations in getting a 10000 watt generator is the size of the fuel tank and the length of the run time.

You should know how long you need to run your generator on any given day – make sure you get a generator that can meet your needs. 

What?!

Take a look at the operational noise level. Nobody – but nobody – wants a noisy generator anywhere near them.

Not your neighbors, not your pets, and not you. If you’re buying a generator for home or RV use, keep the noise down. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need a dual-fuel generator?

Dual-fuel is not a necessity for running your generator, but it does bring you extra benefits like being able to maximize your fuel efficiency.

It can also help you run the generator for longer if you have a supply of each fuel to hand.

What’s the difference between EPA-certification and CARB-approval?

CARB is the California Air Resources Board, and the EPA is the Environmental Protection Agency.

Usually, the CARB restrictions are more stringent than the EPA’s, so if you have a generator that’s CARB-approved, it’s probably good nationwide, whereas EPA-certification will not be enough in California.

How many outlets should I look for on a 10000 watt generator?

How many do you need? Seriously, that’s the defining characteristic of the generator that’s right for you – does it do what you need.

If you have two handfuls of things that need charging on a standard domestic outlet, don’t pick up a generator that only has one domestic outlet.

It’s as much about the mix of outlets on your generator as it is about numbers – always check you have the right mix that lets you get the most use out of the generator you buy.

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    I'm an environment and energy blogger who teaches outdoor and energy enthusiasts how to be better informed when it comes to purchasing or maintaining a generator, solar panel system, or anything else related to your energy needs.